The Sacred Mystery of Each

"Every person is a sacred mystery."  A few years back, Ron Austin caught my attention with this little statement in a brief talk at Act One: Screenwriting for Hollywood.   He was reminding us that each person has an essential beauty and mystery, and that to see each person we meet as sacrament is to heighten the …

Hunting for Books: Lead Me To A Good One

There were hundreds of books, and as always, the stakes were high.  But you can't think about it that way.  Who wants to remember that every single time you read a book, you--and the world--change? Choosing a book is like choosing anything these days.   There are uncountable choices, and we are given that crazy …

A Call for Syllabus Ideas

The title of the university class is this: The Arts and Culture: A Christian Aesthetic.   It’s in January, is one week long, 8-5 for five days straight, beginning Monday, and there’s a two-three hour final on Friday afternoon.   I’ve been teaching this class for ten years, a couple of years on my own, and the …

Meaning: Find It? Make It?

Eric Maisel, in his book Coaching the Artist Within, declares that one of the primary skills in living successfully is to “passionately make meaning.”   I’ve read a couple of Maisel’s books.  Maisel’s a family therapist and creativity coach, with a Phd in psychology.  He may not believe in God, but he’s a good writer, and …

Random Snatches of April

"In the main, and from the beginning of time, mysticism has kept men sane.  The thing that has driven them mad was logic."  -  G.K. Chesterton And here's a line from a poem from the same magazine I saw the Chesterton quote in, the fabulous The Sun.  The poem is by Joe Wilkins, called "Manifesto". …

Leading With a Limp

Leadership is on my mind in a big way these days. I seem to have been called into a place of unsought leadership, and I'm making my way cautiously, carefully, reluctant, and willing to embrace whatever comes. The book at my side just now is Dan Allender's Leading With a Limp. Dan Allender is the …

The Subtle Knife

I didn't laugh as much as I plowed through this one. I mentioned that I laughed a bit during The Golden Compass because it was so obvious what Philip Pullman was up to according to quantum physics and the  psychology of Jung, James Hillman and Thomas Moore.  In The Subtle Knife, Pullman gains steam and …